Past Z-Arts! Events

Ongoing Show

Posted by on Sep 3, 2014 in Past Visual Arts Events | 0 comments

Ongoing Show

the sentinel zion

Exhibition dates are October 7 through November 15, 2014.

Exhibit is at the Canyon Community Center Gallery in Springdale, Utah.

Description of the Woodcut Printmaking Process:

Rendering the colorful canyons and features of Zion in black and white is a bit of a challenge. This unique interpretation requires simplification and was accomplished by drawing the view then drawing from the drawing with brush and ink and then redrawing using that drawing as reference, and continuing this process until I arrived at a drawing which retained a sense of place and still held a pleasing sense of design. Reversing the drawing and transferring to the cherry wood block preceded the carving and proofing process. Finally, pulling an edition of prints on French made Rives paper.

Artist Statement:

I would hope one would take away another perspective of how to look at Zion and begin to notice the stark contrasts and ruggedness of the canyon. An appreciation for woodcut printmaking would also be a plus.

~Royden Card

Gallery Hours:

Mon–Thurs 10:00 am to 7:00 pm

Friday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Saturday Noon to 5:00 pm

Closed Sundays

 

Support for this event was provided by the Utah Arts and Museums Program.

 

Support for this event provided by The National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works

“Stone Spirit” Exhibit by Tom Wheeler

Posted by on Jun 26, 2014 in Past Events, Past Visual Arts Events | 0 comments

“Stone Spirit” Exhibit by Tom Wheeler

stone spiritThe July 15 through August 24 exhibition at the Canyon Community Center in Springdale is of stone compositions meant to represent what artist Tom Wheeler calls “Stone Spirit” figures. These are wall-piece constructions done in stone and wood on textured, painted backgrounds that are either abstract or representational.

The abstract pieces play with the color, shape and texture of the materials while the representational spirits are inspired by petroglyph images of ancient southwest cliff dwellers and by the katsinas (mythical beings) found in today’s Native American Hopi culture. Central to these pieces are the stone figures, dressed in ceremonial robes with large fancy collars and masked faces whose ancient eyes peer out into today’s world.

Support for this event was provided by the Utah Arts and Museums Program.

 

Support for this event provided by The National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works

 

“Flow” – 2014 Juried Art Show

Posted by on Jun 5, 2014 in Past Events, Past Visual Arts Events | 0 comments

“Flow” – 2014 Juried Art Show

“Flow” – 2014 Annual Juried Art Show

FLOW is the “ mental state of operation in which a person performing an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity. In essence, flow is characterized by complete absorption in what one does.”

For this year’s Annual Juried Show, artists have interpreted “Flow,” and expressed how it inspires them; whether mentally, physically, or even metaphysically.

This year, 65 pieces of art are on display and most are being offered for sale by the 35 artists. The show is free to attend.

Gallery Show Dates: August 27 through October 3, 2014

Gallery Hours:

Mon–Thurs 10:00 am to 7:00 pm
Friday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm
Saturday Noon to 5:00 pm
Closed Sundays

 

Support for this event was provided by the Utah Arts and Museums Program.

 

Support for this event provided by The National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works

 

“Maya of Guatemala” Exhibition

Posted by on May 29, 2014 in Past Visual Arts Events | 0 comments

“Maya of Guatemala” Exhibition

Rooster Girl Full ImageExhibition of photographs by Michael Plyler runs from June 9 through July 14, 2014 at the Canyon Community Center in Springdale, UT.

The Loss of Cultural Identity in a Rapidly Changing World

The highland Maya of Guatemala are direct descendants of the pyramid-builders of such classic Maya sites as Tikal, Palenque, Caracol, and others. The Maya have been a continuously existing culture for 4,500 years, predating Rome by almost 1,000 years. They were the first culture to develop the mathematical concept of zero, which was not used in Europe until 1200 A.D. Their astronomical accomplishments are formidable. They calculated the path of Venus with an error of only 14 seconds a year, their lunar cycle was accurate to within 24 seconds of today’s atomic clocks, and their calendar projected 30,000 years into the future has an error of less than three minutes.

Michael Plyler has been photographing the Maya of Guatemala since 1982 and has made 15 trips there between 1982 and 2008 to record his vision. Trained as an archaeologist, Plyler brings an anthropological perspective to his photography. Over the course of the years his black and white portraits record the subtle changes and diminishment of the traditional dress, or traje. His photographs of the Maya are contained in the permanent collections of the Museum of the American Indian, the Heard Museum, the San Diego Museum of Man, the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, the Barrick Museum of Natural History at the University of Nevada – Las Vegas, the Museo Ixchel in Guatemala City, Instituto Guatemalteco de Turismo in Guatemala City, and the premier research center in Central America, Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de Meso America (CIRMA) in Antigua, Guatemala. In 2013 Michael had the distinct honor of having a large body of his Mayan portraits added to the permanent collection of the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.

 

 

Support for this event was provided by the Utah Arts and Museums Program.

 

  : Support for this event provided by The National Endowment for the Arts

 

Visual Arts Exhibit

Posted by on Apr 9, 2014 in Past Events, Past Visual Arts Events | 0 comments

Visual Arts Exhibit

Visit the Canyon Community Center Gallery in Springdale between April 12 and May 12, 2014 and experience the work of two Springdale artists.

Douglas Gregg and Paul Mailloux interpret “The Color of Light” through the medium of glass and photography.

 

There will be an Artist Reception on Tuesday April 15th from 7-8 pm at the Canyon Community Center in Springdale.

artflyerd1

 

 

Support for this event was provided by the Utah Arts and Museums Program.

“Let Us Break Bread Together”

Posted by on Mar 27, 2014 in Past Events, Past Humanities Events | 0 comments

“Let Us Break Bread Together”

Free Community Pot Luck from 11:30 am to 2 pm at the Springdale Canyon Community Center Gazebo.

All are welcome to join together in a celebration of good eats and the best of traditional cooking. Bring your special dish!

Beverages and tableware will be provided.

Utah Humanities Council

Utah Humanities Council

“Stories We Tell” Film & Lecture

Posted by on Mar 27, 2014 in Past Events, Past Film Events | 0 comments

“Stories We Tell” Film & Lecture

Free film and lecture presentation at the Springdale Canyon Community Center on Friday, May 2, 2014 at 7 pm.

In this inspired, genre-twisting new film, Oscar©-nominated writer/director Sarah Polley discovers that the truth depends on who’s telling it. Polley is both filmmaker and detective as she investigates the secrets kept by a family of storytellers. She playfully interviews and interrogates a cast of characters of varying reliability, eliciting refreshingly candid, yet mostly contradictory, answers to the same questions.

The presentation includes a post-film discussion by Mark Jeffreys centering around the question: “Are Stories Good for Us?” Mark has a Ph.D. in both English and anthropology, and is currently the Chair of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, as well as Director of Honors, at Dixie University.

Attendance is free.

Support for this event was provided by the Utah Arts and Museums Program.

  : Support for this event provided by The National Endowment for the Arts

Support for this event was provided by the Washington County Library.

Z-Arts Writing Contest 2014

Posted by on Mar 1, 2014 in Past Events, Past Literary Events | 0 comments

Z-Arts Writing Contest 2014

(Deadline April 18!) Z-Arts is happy to announce the 6th annual Z-Arts Writing Contest, sponsored by the Zion Canyon Arts and Humanities Council. Professional, freelance and all other writers are invited to submit entries on a theme chosen by the “Figure of Speech” game described below. Almost everyone will have something different. Good luck and have fun !

The Figure of Speech Game

  1. To play the game you will need 3 jars (or hats) and some paper and scissors.

  2. You may also want to print out this Blank PDF Form to fill out the words you will need.
  3. For the first jar, write on a sheet of paper at least twenty adjectives such as “angry,” “red,” “howling,” “white,” etc. and then cut each word out into separate strips. You can use the words on the blank form for starters, or better yet, get an old magazine or newspaper and clip out words. Put all the adjective words into the first jar.

  4. For the second jar, write down at least twenty nouns; in other words, things you can see, such as “rabbit,” “pencil,” “lightning bolt,” etc. Cut them up into strips and put them into the second jar. Again, you can use the list provided here, write your own, or cut them out of a magazine or newspaper.

  5. For the third jar, write down at least twenty abstractions, such as “truth,” “winter,” “revenge,” “friendship,” and so on. Put these strips into the third jar.

  6. To play the game, pull one word at random out of each jar and write them down on a sheet of paper, along with the words THE and OF, to make a figure-of-speech that looks like this:

THE [Adjective] [Noun] OF [Abstraction]

        So for example, if you drew “angry,” “porcupine,” and “forgiveness,” then you would write:

THE Angry Porcupine OF Forgiveness

  1. You must use one of the phrases you draw as the title of your piece. If you don’t like the first one, keep drawing until something “speaks” to you. You do not have to use the phrase in the body of your piece, but the theme expressed by the title must somehow appear in the piece. The object (e.g. the porcupine) may appear in the piece, or it just be referred to. The phrase can either be the main subject, or said by somebody in passing as part of your story or essay. The adjective (e.g. “angry”) at the beginning is optional, you don’t have to use it if you don’t want to, or if it sounds better without it. Do NOT use “the angry porcupine of forgiveness.” That was just an example, and it is very unlikely that you would draw it at random.

  2. If you are submitting poems, you may draw a different figure-of-speech for each poem, or you can use the same title for all of them.

If the very first phrase you draw seems strange or silly, don’t reject it immediately, but give it some thought. Consider our example “the angry porcupine of forgiveness.” It sounds strange, but ask yourself, how is forgiveness like a porcupine? Why would it be angry? Does forgiveness sometimes sting the person being forgiven? Does forgiveness have its quills? Porcupines are also shy, and forgiveness often takes courage. If the phrase sounds strange, then that may be a good thing, because it is interesting, and people like to read interesting things. The phrases that you should reject are the ones that are too obvious. “The White Horse of Justice” for example, is not very interesting because everybody would expect Justice to be a White Horse. “The Mysterious Rabbit of Justice,” however, would be a horse of a different color. 

Good Luck !

Contest Rules

  1. The contest is open to all residents of Washington County, UT.
  2. All entries must be previously unpublished and received via email no later than Friday, April 18, 2014.
  3. In order for submissions to be read anonymously, the name of the author must only appear on the cover pages. Should the name of the author appear in any part of the actual text, the submission will be excluded from the contest.
  4. This year there is a 1200 word limit for all submissions. Multiple poems may be submitted, but the total word count limit is 1200.
  5. All submissions will be judged on theme, composition, originality, and lyricism.
  6. See below for additional submission guidelines.

Divisions and Categories:

Adult Division  (ages 19 and above)

  • Adult Non-fiction Category: Essay, observation, journal excerpt, editorial, memoir
    or excerpt from a longer piece (no more than 1200 words)
  • Adult Fiction Category: Short story or excerpt from a longer novel
    (no more than 1200 words)
  • Adult Poetry Category: Poetic prose, free verse or traditional
    (1-5 poems totaling no more than 1200 words)

Junior Division (ages 13-18)

  • Junior Non-fiction Category: Essay, observation, journal excerpt, editorial, memoir
    or excerpt from a longer piece (no more than 1200 words)
  • Junior Fiction Category: Short story or excerpt from a longer novel (no more than 1200 words)
  • Junior Poetry Category: Poetic prose, free verse or traditional (1-5 poems totaling no more than 1200 words)

Elementary Division (ages 5-12)

  • Short story, poetry or non-fiction Category: 1-5 poems and/or no more than 1200 words.

Awards Ceremony

A Literary Event will be held on Friday, May 9 at the Canyon Community Center to celebrate the art and craft of writing, and to distribute the awards for First and Second Place in each of the categories.  Each First Place winner will receive a $75.00 cash prize and each Second Place winner will receive a $50.00 cash prize. Additional “Judge’s Choice” awards may also be given out for works deserving special recognition. If you are a winner you will be notified at the end of April.

Unless otherwise notified, acceptance of your award grants Z-Arts permission to post the entry in our newsletter, website, blog, facebook page or other online or printed form. Z-Arts does not retain the rights to the individual entry.

How to Submit

Please use this blank cover page as a template for your submission.

All entries should be submitted electronically as an RTF or Word formatted document. Scanned PDFs or printed hardcopy sent by US mail are no longer acceptable. Entries must be double spaced and begin with a cover page. Each poem submitted must include a separate and individual cover page. All cover pages must include the following information:

  • Name of the author
  • Phone number
  • Division and Category of submission
  • e-mail address and/or mailing address
  • For student submissions, also include the School contact information

Cover pages will be removed for judging in order for submissions to be read anonymously. Should the name of the author appear on any part of the actual text, the submission will be excluded from the contest. The title and page number must be included in the header of each text page submitted.

Send your submission as an attachment to: contest@zarts.org. Please use the Subject Line: “Writing Contest 2014″. You should receive an acknowledgment that your submission was received.

Feedback

For questions or comments regarding this contest, send email to: literary@zarts.org.

Utah Arts & Museums Show

Posted by on Mar 1, 2014 in Past Events, Past Visual Arts Events | 0 comments

Utah Arts & Museums Show

A Utah Arts & Museums exhibit named “Untitled” is on display now through April 11th at the Canyon Community Center in Springdale. This show encourages the viewer to come up with their own title to each piece.

What’s in a name? When you approach a painting in a museum or gallery is reading the title one of the first things you do? Does that affect your perception of the piece? How necessary is a title when it comes to art? Many artists find it a bother and use the default “Untitled” when it comes time to label their work. Perhaps they want the work to speak for itself and let the viewer decide what it means to them.

Back in 2004 Utah Arts & Museum’s began hosting a biannual “Untitled” exhibit and now, it’s time to take that show on the road. Instead of a title, the work comes with a note that invites the visitors to examine the artwork and decide what they think it should be called. We don’t often realize how we are affected by the images around us. This exhibit forces us to think about it, put it on paper and share it with everyone else. It’s also an unconventional and anonymous way for artists to get honest feedback about their work. We want your insights. And who knows? Maybe the artist will keep your title.

About Utah Arts & Museums and the Traveling Exhibit Program
Utah Arts & Museumsʼ Traveling Exhibit Program is a statewide outreach program that provides schools, museums, libraries, and community galleries with the opportunity to bring curated exhibitions to their community. This program is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Utah Arts & Museums is a division of the Utah Department of Heritage and Arts (DHA). To enrich the quality of life for the people of Utah, DHA creates, preserves, and promotes Heritage and Arts. The Division provides funding, education, and technical services to individuals and organizations statewide so that all Utahns, regardless of race, gender, ethnicity or economic status, can access, understand, and receive the benefits of arts and culture.

Support for this event was provided by the Utah Arts and Museums Program.

Lecture By Kate Holbrook

Posted by on Feb 24, 2014 in Past Events, Past Humanities Events | 0 comments

Lecture By Kate Holbrook

Join Kate Holbrook at the Canyon Community Center in Springdale at 7 pm on Saturday March 8th for a free community lecture titled “Radical Food: Mormon Foodways and the American Mainstream”.

Kate Holbrook who is currently working on her Ph.D. in religious studies from Boston University, will examine LDS food culture throughout the mid-twentieth century and how this culture affected the relationship between Mormons and broader society.

Holbrook’s research goes well beyond “funeral potatoes” and Jello. She will look at what Mormons in the mid-20th century thought was good or bad to eat, the importance of Welfare Square and family gardens, fasting, table manners and hospitality.
 

Utah Humanities Council

Utah Humanities Council